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Parents who refuse to vaccinate generally do so because of dubious concerns about the safety of vaccines, not because they don't believe in the germ theory. Likewise, the argument against flu shots is not based on germ theory.

As for why not, as I said: germ theory and evolution are so well supported that all the (evidence- and reasoning-based) disagreement with them will be the result of mistakes or misconceptions. Choosing to allow students to believe in mistakes or misconceptions goes against the whole point of school.






Parents who refuse to vaccinate generally do so because of dubious concerns about the safety of vaccines

Our education system does not teach students to think for themselves but to trust the established authorities. But not infrequently the supposedly infallible establishment is shown to be totally wrong (the history of the germ theory is a perfect example of this). Not surprisingly, some people start searching for different authorities (such as anti-vaccination “experts”) in which they can put their blind trust.
Choosing to allow students to believe in mistakes or misconceptions goes against the whole point of school.

In my opinion students should be allowed to have their own views. This inevitably means that some of these views would be wrong. In any case, close to 40% of American students leave schools with a belief in creationism. So avoiding the mention of pseudo-scientific theories does not mean students won't end up by believing them.
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melian
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