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Wait, by 1), do you mean that you're an X, and when you take the test as an X it says you're biased against Ys, but when you check the Y box the results say you're biased against Xs?

2, 3) Of course everyone has biases, and it's possible to live with them. But people vary in how strongly they harbor various biases, and I would find it very surprising if greater unconscious racism/sexism/etc. did not on average reduce the effectiveness of collaboration with members of the biased-against groups (and also make life worse for those members, possibly impeding your company's recruiting ability)

And while it may seem scary to judge individuals for something in their heads they can't control, isn't screening for intelligence exactly that?







Of course everyone has biases, and it's possible to live with them. But people vary in how strongly they harbor various biases, and I would find it very surprising if greater unconscious racism/sexism/etc.


What definition of "bias" are you using that the type of "racism/sexism/etc." counts as a "bias"? Or does having true aliefs now count as a "bias"?
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VoiceOfRa
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do you mean that you're an X, and when you take the test as an X it says you're biased against Ys, but when you check the Y box the results say you're biased against Xs?

No, they had separate tests for different ethnicities. Before starting a test for each ethnicity you were supposed to check the box on whether you belong to that ethnicity.
I would find it very surprising if greater unconscious racism/sexism/etc. did not on average reduce the effectiveness of collaboration with members of the biased-against groups

If unconscious biases were so important, I would expect companies in countries where such biases are generally much stronger (e.g., Singapore) not being able to compete with their western competitors.
it may seem scary to judge individuals for something in their heads they can't control

What made 1984 so scary to me when I first read it is precisely the opposite - what people think in their heads can be controlled. Obviously, physical torture is more effective, but the threat to employment prospects is also a pretty strong motivator.
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melian
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