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Under a technocracy, the incentives would be the same as an for an individual in any job; comparable to many existing bureaucrats. Certain bureaucratic agencies are poorly designed, but others seem to be well designed. By contrast, EVERY legislature seems to be poorly designed. If the bureaucrats' job description is straightforward with easily graded metrics, like the way central banks work today, I predict it would also be straightforward to determine whether they are doing their job, and should be allowed to continue in it.






If the bureaucrats' job description is straightforward with easily graded metrics, like the way central banks work

Central banks may have well defined goals (full employment and low inflation), but the achievement of these goals mostly depends on factors outside of their control. When central banks fail to meet their targets, there is usually no consensus among economists on whether the banks, government policies or economic cycles are to blame.
I predict it would also be straightforward to determine whether they are doing their job, and should be allowed to continue in it.

Who would make this decision?
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melian
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Under a technocracy, the incentives would be the same as an for an individual in any job; comparable to many existing bureaucrats.
In most jobs the incentives are promotion or getting a raise by pleasing the boss.

That doesn't help you with choosing the way the top works.
If the bureaucrats' job description is straightforward with easily graded metrics, like the way central banks work today
Central banks today work in a way where it's head have incentives to act in a way that the banking community wants to get consulting contracts after their tenure.

Do you basically want to copy China's system? Otherwise where do you think your suggestion differs from the Chinese model?
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ChristianKl
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