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Empirically I don't think we see that states don't fund basic science because of freeriding concerns.

As VoiceOfRa already said, centraliziation of scientific research is bad because it forces the whole community to persue the same approach.

The blue brain project is likely worse value to money than if you would distribute the same pot of money to a variety of different projects that ask a variety of different questions about the domain of neuroscience, cognitive psychology and decision science.

If you look at basic research it's also important to note that governments aren't the only one's engaged in the topic.
Keith Stanovich project to spend a million dollar to develop a good test for rationality wasn't funded by the government but by the Tempelton foundation.

It's a quite important project because measuring rationality that way will tell us which genes increase rationality and a host of other issues. It's quite funny how the nonphysicalist Tempelton foundation helps to advance rationality while the government funded science rather funds voodoo fMRI studies and the blue brain project.

These days John Ioannidis who does very important basic research also get's the funding for his lab from a private foundation. That allows Ioannidis to criticize the scientific establishment much better than if he would get founding by a single big international science agency.






Empirically I don't think we see that states don't fund basic science because of freeriding concerns.

The states do fund science but since their main motive appears to be national prestige, they may be investing significantly less resources in it.
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melian
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