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Some questions as examples of the complexity of politics:

Macroeconomics
What does MV=PQ stand for? Please explain.

Health Care
Laws banning insurance from discriminating based on pre-existing conditions such as the ACA are generally said to require two other changes to be enacted simultaneously to prevent major problems. What are those two changes and how do they interact?

Price Controls
What happens when prices are fixed above market equilibrium? Why is the minimum wage often considered by liberal economists to be an exception?

Education
What is the PISA?

Immigration
Immigrants compete with natives for jobs, yet empirical studies have found they are often found to make natives the same or often slightly better off in terms of economic standing. Why?

Abortion
Roughly how developed is a fetus at 9 weeks? 16 weeks?

Negotiation
If 7 people are deciding on a policy proposal, and they are evenly distributed from left-right where Person A is the most liberal and Person G is the most conservative, and 4 votes are required for the proposal to pass, which person has the most bargaining power? If Person C wishes to increase his bargaining power, is it better for him to become more liberal or more conservative? What about Person A?

Political Science
What are the 3 branches of the Iron Triangle?

Public Opinion (US based)
Rank these federal spending programs in order of popularity:
Foreign Aid
Social Security
Education
Defense






Some questions as examples of the complexity of politics:

Immigrants compete with natives for jobs, yet empirical studies have found they are often found to make natives the same or often slightly better off in terms of economic standing. Why?


I don't think this is a complex question. The economic impact of immigration on natives is indeed complex, but the results of "empirical studies" are generally predictable. Researchers who would dare to claim that the effects on natives are negative would become academic pariahs and, quite likely, lose their jobs.
61%
melian
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I think the immigration question is ill-posed. Empirical studies show that something happens. They don't show why something happens. At best, the empirical studies provide data which you can use to create hypotheses to later test. A question that asks why an empirical study shows something is asking for pure speculation, not for knowledge or reasoning (unless you want the respondent to answer based on the result of other studies to which you are not referring).

Worse yet, the question includes the weasel word "often". Since "often" can be less than 50%, one possible speculation which answers the question as asked would be "immigration is harmful to natives, but the data has a lot of noise and confounding factors".

Finally, "immigration" is itself a slanted term. Actual political controversies surrounding "immigration" are not about immigration in general; they are about specific subgroups of immigration. Data that is actually about immigration in general often won't apply to them, and are often part of a pro-immigration motte-and-bailey where the motte is "immigration is good" and the bailey is "the particular kind of immigration I am talking about is good".
66%
Jiro
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While the topics might be okay the wordings of the questions are way way too opinion loaded to work as a good knowledge test. The health care question is especially bad as it test memory more than being able to apply a concept and can be read almost as if testing for an attitude (for which a leaning neutral test should not do, it should just stick to knowledge).
56%
Fwiffo
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For some reason I'm tempted to read this as a quiz to determine if a person is informed enough to vote. (I'm almost sure you didn't mean it this way, though.) If that's the case, I sure as hell failed it.
66%
Dahlen
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