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but the absence of correlation does imply the absence of causation.


Didn't you say there was a correlation?

By contrast, countries with the highest minimum wages (relative to the GDP per capita) are among the world poorest.


It's unlikely to get no correlation when there's a causal structure involved unless it involves something correcting itself, but you can still get a negative correlation if there would otherwise be an even stronger negative correlation.

I think, as a general rule, the burden of proof should be on those who want to create a new legal restriction rather than on those who oppose it.


According to the Department of Labor:

A review of 64 studies on minimum wage increases found no discernable effect on employment. Additionally, more than 600 economists, seven of them Nobel Prize winners in economics, have signed onto a letter in support of raising the minimum wage to $10.10 by 2016.


Honestly, I'm skeptical of this too, but it's one thing to say they have the burden of finding evidence. It's another to say they have the burden of changing your mind.






Didn't you say there was a correlation?

No, just that there was no obvious positive correlation and many counter-examples.

it's one thing to say they have the burden of finding evidence. It's another to say they have the burden of changing your mind.

I would not put much weight on a petition by 600 left-wing economists. It would be easy to find 600 right-wing economists who believe the opposite (though it would definitely be a lot harder to make them sign a petition in support of lowering the minimum wage).

I would also take with a grain of salt any claims from the website that belongs to the Department of Labor (whose employees might lose their jobs if they contradict the official line of the White House).

Given the political biases in this question, the only evidence I would seriously consider is simple and easily verifiable statistics (something like in this example). Is it really an excessive requirement?
you can still get a negative correlation if there would otherwise be an even stronger negative correlation.

Sure. For example, taking a certain drug can be negatively correlated with being healthy because it is taken only by the sick people. But, in medicine, the drugs are tested by comparing two groups - sick people who get it and sick people who don't. Similarly, we might compare the effect of minimum wage laws on otherwise similar countries. If minimum wage laws work, we should see more poor people in countries without them.
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melian
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