OMNILIBRIUM
  Rational Discussion of Controversial Topics


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ChristianKl 27 October 2015 02:49 PM
64%

Keith Stanovich who's an professor of Applied Psychology and who's developing the Rationality Quotient wrote a book titled "How To Think Straight About Psychology". It has a chapter on why that's a wrong model for thinking about the world while at the same time the average layman follows that model.

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melian 29 October 2015 07:27 AM
70%

This might be another difference between “soft” and “hard” sciences. I believe Feynman mentions somewhere (I’m sorry that I cannot give you the exact reference) that a physicist who wants to understand a complex phenomenon must identify the important factors and neglect the rest.

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Benito 30 October 2015 02:59 AM
64%

That sounds like a standard use of the pareto principle, that the most information is in a few variables. Nonetheless, I would be very interested to hear a short summary of Stanovich's argument, I respect him very much.

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ChristianKl 2 November 2015 01:08 PM
62%

Physicists usually design their experiments to focus on as few factor as possible. That's highly useful for understanding complex phenomenons. On the other hand that doesn't mean that natural experiments work the same way.
Especially those in the social sciences, like the one we are talking about in this thread.

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